crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-08-20 12:23 pm

Links roundup linked

Fresh from Symposium Blog: Fans, geeks, wrestlers, and Sherlock Holmes: links roundup.

Also new: Karen Hellekson, co-editor of OTW's Transformative Works & Cultures online journal, on Breaking the primacy of print.


Has anyone been watching the new season of SYTYCD Canada? Apparently there are four episodes out already. After the fiasco of the most recent U.S. season, and the cancellation of the Australia version, I'm just not sure I'm ready to plunge into yet another cycle so soon.

crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-08-16 05:47 pm

Mad Men and Aca-Fen

My new Symposium Blog post is up -- no Mad Men spoilers, I promise! Especially since I'm already two episodes behind!

Thanks for everyone's responses to my question about posting vids on YouTube last week -- I'd still like to writing something up about that, but I'm waiting to track down notes from this year's Vidding & Visibility Town Hall at VividCon.

crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-08-10 11:05 am

Dear Vidders: Why not YouTube?

I'm considering writing a post about vidding for Symposium Blog this week in honor of VividCon, so I thought I'd toss out a question:

As I'm eagerly devouring all the new vids that are coming out, I can't help but notice that for vidders who post streaming versions of their vids, most aren't hosted on YouTube. I see stuff on various Ning vid communities, Vimeo, a couple others, and occasionally self-hosted, but YouTube seems pretty rare, at least as a first choice for streaming vids.

So here's my question -- why not YouTube?

Is it because of:

Video quality?
Advertising?
Concerns re: greater vulnerability to takedown notices from copyright holders?
Privacy/obscurity (e.g. having some control over the audience that sees your vids, rather than anybody potentially stumbling across them)?
Something else?

I'm curious! And also hoping to use responses as fodder for a blog post -- if I get enough answers to write something up, I'll link back to this post but quote from comments w/out names ["one vidder said, 'YouTube killed my parents!'"] unless you explicitly give me permission to use your name. And of course you can also comment anonymously, or ask me to screen your comment.

Thanks!
crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-07-22 03:29 pm

What's with the fucking chicken?

The first part of my hard-hitting investigative report series on anon culture in fandom is now up on Symposium blog.

Yes, I said first part of a series. *sigh* It was getting too long, so I decided to break it up into five themes:

Distraction economy
Counter-public sphere
Communal confessions
Burden of identity
Wrong on the internet

To be continued....

crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-07-18 04:13 pm

Anon culture in fandom

So I'm working on my next post for the Symposium blog and I'd like to write about anonymity in fandom. But I need your help!

I've been following the latest anon meme that sprung out of the ViVidCon debates (is there some kind of Fight Club thing where you're not supposed to link to it? or actually name it? I'm going to err on the side of caution here, but let me know if there are standard anon meme rules or norms I should be observing), and it's been pretty fascinating to see the different dynamics of how discussions play out there vs. on LJ/DW. I've checked out a few other anon memes in the past, but this is the longest I've ever followed one. Yet I haven't left any comments on the meme, so I can't claim to be a participant-observer -- there's something about posting anon that just weirds me out (personally, not when other people do it). I'm not sure what it is, but I definitely got weirded out the couple of times in the past that I posted on anon love memes where you tell people on the flist how awesome they are. Which, hey, people on my flist are awesome, and deserve to hear that! So I don't know what my mental block here is.

So I'd love to hear from any of you about the pleasures (and perils!) of posting anon, or participating in anon memes. I'm also thinking of saying something about kink memes, which are the other major place that I'm aware of that carve out a pro-anon space in fandom, and seem to be on the rise over the last couple of years. But I know even less about kink meme culture than anon memes! So any observations, insights, experiences you'd like to share about kink memes & anonymity would be welcome.

And I think I need a third thing, right? I figured I'd at least reference the WoW/Blizzard Real ID controversy, but it would be nice to have a third instance of anon culture in LJ/DW-based media fandom, if anyone has suggestions.

Anon posting for comments is on, naturally (ETA: and IP logging is off). Thanks in advance!

ETA 2: I've fallen way behind on responding to comments, but I'm reading them all & appreciate all the perspectives & experiences & context that everyone's offering.

ETA 3: The first part of my Symposium blog post on anon memes is now up.

crypto: Amy Pond (Default)
2010-07-07 09:08 pm

New blog, first post

Hey, I just (finally!) made my first post to Symposium blog, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works' Transformative Works and Cultures journal. My co-blogger there is Dana Sterling, who's posted some good stuff about TWC's Supernatural-themed issue and the John Scalzi/Wil Wheaton fan fiction contest.

In my post, I look at fan cultures around MTV's The Hills, and suggest a mode of 'parasocial fandom' to complement what [personal profile] obsession_inc  and [personal profile] damned_colonial  have described as transformational fandom and affirmational fandom.

Okay, that makes my post sound pretty boring -- and it isn't, really! Probably? Anyways, check it out, and feel free to comment there if so moved.